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Predatory Publishing: Understanding & Identifying It

General advice

  • Be cautious.
  • Don't sign anything or send payment if you are unsure.
  • Check with your faculty advisor or a colleague, then consider talking with University Legal Counsel.

If you are suddenly appointed an article to review without your consent*

  • You are under no obligation to review something that you did not volunteer for.
  • You may want to contact the publisher and tell them that you did not agree to a review and/or to not contact you again. 
  • You can add the sender's email to your junk/spam list.

If your name is misappropriated**

  • Contact the journal/publisher immediately and ask that they take your name off of all of their materials.
  • Make it clear in other venues that you do not associate with the publication.
  • Check with your faculty advisor or a colleague, then consider talking with University Legal Counsel.

* Yes, this happens.

** Predatory publishers have been known to list peoples' names as editors, board members, or reviewers without their knowledge.

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