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Start Strong: Build Your Online Course

This training presents a bird's eye view of teaching for instructors looking for a fast-start. Become familiar with the foundations of creating your course and engaging your students.
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Welcome to Start Strong: Build Your Online Course

This training presents a bird's eye view of teaching for instructors looking for a fast-start. Become familiar with the foundations of creating your course and engaging your students.

 

The training is self-paced. Set aside six to eight hours to complete the training. We've included videos and readings to broaden your view of teaching & learning and recommendations for best teaching practice. Look for the downloadable worksheets and examples to help you start planning your courses too. Some information has been summarized, but we encourage you to click through to the original sources.

By the end of this training, you'll be able to:

  • Identify at least three examples of good teaching practices.
  • Write a learning objective.
  • Explain the process of creating a course.
  • Describe a grading rubric.
  • Connect student engagement with teaching practices.

The pre-training is sequentially organized as follows: 

  1. Getting Started - You're here now!
  2. Designing Your Course
  3. Putting It Together
  4. Engaging Your Students
  5. Expanding Your Practice

* The lessons begin in the left-hand column.

You may return to this training any time you'd like. If you have feedback, please forward it to instructionaldesign@mcphs.edu.

Introduction to Engaging and Motivating Students

Driving Question: In what ways was your education different from that being described by the professors in this video?

With the shift towards student-centered, or driven, learning, students must rethink and adjust their learning.  Although our responsibilities as educators doesn't change, how we support that learning - or go about teaching - must be reconsidered.

Topics: Student engagement, collaborative learning, sustained motivation, teacher presence, learning community.

*This video focuses on online; however, the fundamental concepts are relevant in all settings. 

Overview of Good Teaching Practice

Let's start this training off right. Whether you teach online or face-to-face, Arthur Chickering and Zelda Gamson's Seven Principals for Good Practice, written in 1987, are still relevant. Read Applying the Seven Principals for Good Practice to the Online Classroom and learn how to apply these principles:

  1. Encourage contact between students and faculty. 
  2. Develop reciprocity and cooperation among students. 
  3. Encourage active learning. 
  4. Give prompt feedback. 
  5. Emphasize time on task. 
  6. Communicate high expectations. 
  7. Respect diverse talents and ways of learning. 

Let's Get Started!

Okay, you're ready to begin! Select the "1. Designing Your Course" tab at the top of the page to get started.

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